English - Writing

Writing is a complex yet essential life skill, involving many factors. Northam Schools' Federation believes that providing children with the skills of composition, handwriting, spelling and grammatical understanding will empower them to construct and convey meaning using written words. 
 
Writing Intent

Children are active participants in the writing process. They enjoy exploring text types and adapt their skill set to meet the needs of different genres. Children enjoy the social element of storytelling and are curious about author’s writing processes. Children take risks in their writing by independently exploring their own writing style. Children’s enthusiasm for writing helps them to become successful, life-long learners of writing.  

 

Using a variety of exciting, writing stimuli, teachers ensure the writing process provides: 

  • Varied experience 

  • Awe and wonder 

  • Aspiration and ambition 

  • Diversity and understanding 

Planning:
Before we begin to plan, teachers note the 'writerly knowledge' needed for a successful writing outcome, beginning always by identifying the intended effect of the model text before investigating in some detail the elements of grammar, vocabulary and text structure that help to create this.
 
Familiarity with the full potential of a text means we can better focus on elements that will have the biggest impact on our children's learning. 
 
Choosing a core text:
Each teaching sequence is based around a core text.  There are a great many wonderful texts out there to share with children. However, as a Federation we have carefully select ones we base our teaching sequences on to ensure they offer all of the following:
  • something worth discussing;
  • rich language to explore;
  • structures (text and grammatical) that can be replicated to inspire pupils' original compositions;
  • challenge;
  • exposure to a range of genres, plots, settings and storylines across their school life;
  • cultural capital.
The learning process: 
The writing sequence follows a three part structure: Learning about the text (imitate), Practising writing (innovate) and Independent writing (invent).
 

The Teaching and Learning Process  

 

Objective 

Suggested activities 

Evidence in books 

Imitate 

To establish key features of text type 

Elicitation task 

Elicitation task 

To stimulate the children’s interest in the text type 

Comprehension activities, likes/dislikes, thought bubbles, display words 

Photos, think bubbles, evaluative sentences, comprehension questions.  

To internalise the text type 

Acting out the story, boxing up, highlight key features, colour code model text.  

Photos, highlighted text, boxing up, story maps,  

Innovate 

To begin providing children with the tools to successfully construct the text type 

Guided writing, modelled writing, shared writing, grammar sessions, providing text models. 

Writing which demonstrates the key  features of the text type. 

To model the planning process  

Story mapping, boxing up. 

Story map, boxing up. 

To produce writing for formative assessment 

Innovate task 

Innovate task 

Invent 

To address gaps in children’s learning, based on the assessment of innovate writing 

Guided writing, modelled writing, shared writing, grammar sessions, providing text models. 

Writing which demonstrates the key  features of the text type. 

To allow children the opportunity to plan independently  

Story mapping, boxing up. 

Story map, boxing up. 

To produce independent writing,  using children’s own plan and using the key features of the text type 

Invent Task 

Invent Task 

To edit and consolidate learning 

Splodging, editing, tick boxes, paired talk, comparison of Elicitation Task and Invent Task 

Purple pen work, evidence of children self-assessing against own targets, check list of features, grammar toolkit